Monthly Archives: March 2007

Incomprehensible charts in the NYT

I very much admire the anonymous chart-makers at the New York Times. They generally do a magnificent job of presenting information in a clean, easy to understand, and often very clever manner. I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that they’d … Continue reading

Posted in Econoblog | 1 Comment

What would Goldilocks make of Q4 GDP?

Economists are pretty bad at predicting the future (how fast will the economy grow next quarter?). They’re also pretty bad at predicting the present (how fast is the economy growing this quarter?). And, it turns out, they’re equally bad at … Continue reading

Posted in Econoblog | 3 Comments

Stock or Not

Some kind of genius: Stock or Not? Josh Reich has written a lovely little web app which puts two charts side by side. One is a real stock, the other is randomly generated. Can you tell which is which? I … Continue reading

Posted in Econoblog | 1 Comment

Alex Ross live!

If you’re under the age of 35, reading this blog, and free on Sunday, I’m pretty sure that the last thing you want to do is schlep up to 92nd Street at the tender hour of 11 in the morning. … Continue reading

Posted in Not economics | Comments Off

Economics 101

I think we should implement a new corollary to Godwin’s Law — call it McArdle’s Law, after this blog entry at Free Exchange — saying that any time someone mentions “Economics 101″ in a debate, they’ve automatically lost. The point … Continue reading

Posted in Econoblog | 2 Comments

Felix Salmon to blog for Portfolio

It’s in WWD, so I guess that makes it public: I’ve signed on as the finance blogger for portfolio.com, which goes live in mid-April. It’s a big commitment for me — it really is a full-time job, although I don’t … Continue reading

Posted in Econoblog, Not economics | 7 Comments

Counterfeiting statistics, New Yorker edition

As any regular reader of this website knows, all counterfeiting statistics are bullshit. Larissa MacFarquhar’s profile of Harley Lewin in the March 19 issue isn’t online, but it’s a prime example of the problem. I’m sure that what happened is … Continue reading

Posted in Econoblog, Not economics | 2 Comments

Sell-side analysis wants to be free!

Merrill Lynch is worried that too many people are reading its research. Yes, too many. Reports DealBook: Merrill Lynch said it plans to eliminate all access to its research from nonclients and to put new restrictions on the media’s access … Continue reading

Posted in Econoblog | 3 Comments

Banks’ real-estate exposure: Nothing to worry about

Whenever there’s a banking crisis, there seems to be a very good chance that preceding it came some kind of property bubble. Banks have a habit of assuming that secured loans are secure loans, and loaning out enormous chunks of … Continue reading

Posted in Econoblog | 4 Comments

Classical music sales: booming or collapsing?

Journalism, like any other field, is shy when it comes to admitting ignorance. If a journalist wants to write about a subject, he’ll search and search for a self-proclaimed expert until he finds someone who will opine with enough certainty … Continue reading

Posted in Not economics | 2 Comments